HOME ABOUT ME SITE MAP A MEDIEVAL WOMAN'S LIFE - AT HOME - BIRTHS - WEDDINGS - DIVORCE - DEATHS - MANNERS - EDUCATION - EMPLOYMENT - RECREATION
CLOTHES - ITEMS OF CLOTHING - DRESS ACCESSORIES FABRICS & SEWING BEAUTY, HEALTH & HYGIENE MY TALKS MY SEWING MY ARTIFACTS BIBLIOGRAPHY LINKS

A WOMAN'S LIFE

RECREATION

HOLIDAYS & FEAST DAYS

BOARD GAMES

MUSIC

EMBROIDERY

PET KEEPING

READING

DANCING

HORSE RIDING

HAWKING

HUNTING

Reading

Medieval women were often better educated than is generally supposed- at least in the higher merchant classes and the noble classes. Famous woman writer, Christine de Pisan's target audience was other woman. Her books were feminist morality tales which often features allegorical characters like Justice.

Another two well-known pieces of literature are How the Goodwife Taught Her Daughter and Les Mesnagier de Paris, better known as The Goodman of Paris, which was written in 1393 as an instruction manual from an older nobleman for his young fifteen year old bride. This indicated that the young bride was literate enough to be able to read it, even at fifteen. It was intended to be studied and referred to.

Many religious books were commissioned especially for women- Books of Hours and Prayer Books which were usually beautifully illuminated with bright colours and gold leaf.

Other books of poetry and tales of romance were also intended for a female audience.

Copyright © Rosalie Gilbert
All text & photographs within this site are the property of Rosalie Gilbert unless stated.
Art & artifact images remain the property of the owner.
Images and text may not be copied and used without permission.