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A WOMAN'S LIFE

AT HOME

NOBLE WOMEN

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PEASANT WOMEN

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Medieval Noble Women at Home
COOKING - CLEANING - SHOPPING - GARDENING - LIVESTOCK & POULTRY

Although images of noble women usually show scenes of sewing or reading, the reality of a noble woman's responsibilities was nothing short of amazing. Very few were what we would call "the idle rich." As well as managing a household, she was required to have many of the skills that a regular woman had in order to instruct her staff. Her home duties included hiring and firing staff, overseeing orders for the pantry and butlery, checking quality of foodstuffs, fabrics and the prices of them, and a variety of tasks on behalf of her husband. If her husband was away on crusade, this may extend for several years.

Cooking
A noble woman neither did the cooking for her household herself nor did she wait on tables. Even female servants did not bring food to the tables and manuscripts almost always show men cooking in the kitchens and preparing food. A noble woman had no place in the kitchen.

Cleaning
It goes without saying that the cleaning in a noble woman's house was also not done by a noble woman herself.

Laundry was also carried out by female servants who were usually under the charge of a senior laundress who was herself under the charge of the noblewoman.

Spinning/weaving
Christine de Pisan in Le Livre des Trois Vertus writes of the duties of an aristocratic wife and says that while such a wife may not actually do any of the weaving in her household herself, she must be knowledgeable about every facet of the process so that she may oversee each and every stage of the process- from the selection of the fleeces to the final construction of finished garments.

Only embroidery or making of fine pieces was seen as a suitable at-home sewing activity for a noble woman.

Shopping

Gardening
The noble woman did very little actual gardening herself, but rather employed others- both male and female- to tend her flower and vegetable gardens. Noble women are often painted enjoying flower gardens and picking flowers such as the 1410 scene The Garden Of Eden shown at right.

The Goodman of Paris speaks to his young wife about her girlish passtimes which he feels are entirely suitable for her position in society. He says:

Know that I take delight rather than displeasure in your cultivating rose bushes, caring for violets and making chaplets, and also in your dancing and singing; I wish you to continue to do so among our friends and peers, for it is only right and just that you should thus pass the days of your maidenly youth.

I feel that there is a certain emphasis on among our friends and peers, and is not to be confused with gardening with the servants.

Livestock/Poultry
Aagain, this was not the domain of the wealthy woman who hired the staff neccessary to look after any animals. Even a Lady's favourite horse for riding or hawking was not cared for by herself, but rather a groom and a stable boy.

A Lady would not even have fed her own little lap dog or cat, leaving that to the cook or a servant.

Child raising
Wet nurses were not uncommon in the world of the noble lady. We constantly see the Virgin Mary held up as the finest example of motherhhod that a woman might aim to emulate, and a large portion of those images show her breastfeeding and taking care of her own child, the reality was quite different.

Just as a busy upper class woman bottle-feeds her babies today and has one or more nannies to take care of them, a busy and socially-important medieval woman also had her children cared for by others.

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